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Food & recipes 

Welcome to our food page.  Native cooking can rival any cuisine on the planet. From basic frybread to complex game dishes that integrate European ingredients, native dishes are continually evolving.

Native American cuisine includes all foods and food practices of the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Information about Native American cuisine comes from a great variety of sources. Modern-day native peoples retain a rich body of traditional foods, some of which have become iconic of present-day Native American social gatherings, for example, frybread, fry bread. Foods like cornbread, salsa, posole, mesquite meal, New Mexico chile powder, sun-dried tomatoes, pine nuts , pinion nuts, diced jalapenos, blue cornmeal, Albondigas Soup, Anasazi Bean Soup, Chico's Chili, Green Chile Stew, Posole Stew, Black Bean Soup, Mexican Rice, Tortilla Soup, Zuni Pot of Gold, Brew Bread Mix, Hopi Blue Corn Muffins with Pine Nuts, Jalapeno Corn Bread, Navajo Sage Bread, Pueblo Corn Bread, Indian Fry Bread, Arizona Griddle Cakes with Blueberries, Hopi Blue Dumplings, blue - red and rainbow popcorn, three sisters, Katsina Corn Dumplings, Black Bean Corn Salsa,  cranberry, blueberry, hominy and mush are known to have been adopted into the cuisine of the United States from Native American groups. In other cases, documents from the early periods of contact with European, African, and Asian peoples allow the recovery of food practices which passed out of popularity.

Modern-day Native American cuisine can cover as wide of range as the imagination of the chef who adopts or adapts this cuisine to present. The use of indigenous domesticated and wild food ingredients can represent Native American food and cuisine. North American Native Cuisine can differ somewhat from Southwestern and Mexican Cuisine in its simplicity and directness of flavor. The use of ramps, wild ginger, miners' lettuce, and juniper can impart subtle flavours to various dishes. Native American food is not a historic subject but one of living flavours and ideas. A chef preparing a Native American dish can adopt, create, and alter as his or her imagination dictates.

 
 

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How to Grow a Native American Three Sisters Garden

Spirit of the Harvest: North American Indian Cooking

More American Indian Cook Books

The Art of American Indian Cooking

All about Native American food

NativeChat Delicatessen - Buffalo - Elk - Deer - jerky - Steaks - Sausage - Burger - jerky  - Wild Game -  smoked  Salmon

 

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Spirit of the Harvest: North American Indian Cooking

Spirit of the Harvest: North American Indian Cooking by Martin Jacobs
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Buffalo - Top Sirloin 4/10oz Steaks Buffalo - Top Sirloin 4/10oz Steaks
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CuisineMentor Native American Three Sisters Stew Gourmet Spice Blend with Chipotle. Gluten Free. Great party enchiladas! CuisineMentor Native American Three Sisters Stew Gourmet Spice Blend with Chipotle. Gluten Free. Great party enchiladas!
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American Indian Cooking: Recipes from the Southwest American Indian Cooking: Recipes from the Southwest by Carolyn Niethammer
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Native American Three Sisters Stew Gourmet Spice Blend
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Regular Blue Corn Meal, A finely ground whole grain that is perfect for all corn meal recipes. Regular Blue Corn Meal, A finely ground whole grain that is perfect for all corn meal recipes.
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Blue Corn Muffin and Cornbread MixBlue Corn Muffin and Cornbread Mix
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Native Indian Cookbook: Wild Game, Fish, and Wild Edibles Native Indian Cookbook: Wild Game, Fish, and Wild Edibles by David Hunt
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BLUE CORNMEAL,  (OG), 10 lbs.
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Parched Blue Corn Snack Parched Blue Corn Snack
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New! Native American Potlatch Cooking Kit
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Roasted Red Chile Sauce Roasted Red Chile Sauce
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Los Chileros White Corn Posole, 12-Ounce Packages (Pack of 12) Los Chileros White Corn Posole, 12-Ounce Packages (Pack of 12)
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Los Chileros Blue Corn Posole, 12-Ounce Packages (Pack of 12) Los Chileros Blue Corn Posole, 12-Ounce Packages (Pack of 12)
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Blue Corn Tamales
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Los Chileros Green Chile Stew with Tortilla Mix, 13-Ounce Boxes (Pack of 6) Los Chileros Green Chile Stew with Tortilla Mix, 13-Ounce Boxes (Pack of 6)
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Frontier Soups Homemade In Minutes™ South Of The Border Tortilla Soup, 4.5-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) Frontier Soups Homemade In Minutes™ South Of The Border Tortilla Soup, 4.5-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4)
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Juanita's Meatball Soup Albondigas, 29 oz. Juanita's Meatball Soup Albondigas, 29 oz.
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Recipes From Our Chat Members

THE THREE SISTERS (Common to many nations) Contributed by ^Sammy

I first heard the story of THE THREE SISTERS over 30 years ago. My father-in-law planted the family garden each year and we were all to go and regularly admire the progress. About six weeks after planting, I was duly impressed with it’s progress, but automatically bent down to pull "a couple of weeds." I saw what did not appear to be normal vegetation around the bean plants. They sure looked like weeds to me. Grampie explained to me what was growing. He told me the story of the Three Sisters…the corn stalk, the bean vine and the squash. He then took me to his sister’s house where another garden was growing. There I saw mounds of earth where the same type of vegetation was growing. She planted those three vegetables every year in the traditional way.

Margaret hoed up mounds of earth, and planted three seeds in each mound….corn, two varieties of beans, and a squash seed. She told me the corn stalk provided a sturdy stem for the beans to ‘twine’ up on. The beans in return took nitrogen from the air and put it in the ground for nutrients for healthy plants. The squash, on the other hand, laid on the ground to prevent weeds and to preserve moisture for all three.

Margaret is 92 years of age today, and is still planting her garden. She is one of the most incredible ladies I have ever met. Margaret is the geneologist of our family, and is fascinated by the computer and the printoffs I provide her.

She also educated me in the nutrient value of the bean, corn and squash combination. Three Sister Soup is a perfect food. Frozen in cup increments, it’s a wonderful tonic, and a wonderful taste.

 THREE SISTER SOUP

6 cups of liquid. (water, homemade chicken broth, or vegetable broth)
2 cups of fresh corn off the cob
1 cup of fresh green/yellow beans
1 cup of fresh peas
1 cup of light yellow pinto beans
1 ½ cups of butternut/buttercup squash (or pumpkin)
2 bay leafs
Salt and pepper to taste

Simmer all the veggies for about an hour and a half. (The simmering for that amount of time blends the flavour to an incredible flavour).

The blend of spices/herbs is your taste. I like a southwestern blend….chilies, cumin, etc. Or a nice mild flavour blend of parsley, basil, savory, oregano is wonderful.   Place in blender and puree.

Serve with bisquits, bannock or scones.

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SINGLE MANS SURVIVAL DISH # 1 - Contributed by MWolf
Start with 1 can of Campbell's Chicken and Rice soup
Add 1 cup of water
Add 2 cups of rice
 
Boil 'til it boils over on the stove, then remove from heat. Allow to simmer for 4-5 minutes. Then add 1 can of boneless white chicken. Season with salt and pepper and serve. Serving one. Dawg licks the plate.
SINGLE MANS SURVIVAL DISH #2 (Cherokee) Contributed by MWolf
-Take burgers
-Cook till all grease is in pan
-Let soak in grease for 5 minutes
-Pour off grease
-Serve between two pieces of bread with mustard
 
(^sammy’s advice…see doctor regular once a year….. for artery clog test!!!)
MOM’S BANNOCK (Mi’kmaq) Contributed by ^Sammy
4 cups of flour
1/3 cup of sugar (optional and approx.)
5 tsps of baking powder (rounded)
1 tsp of salt
2/3 cup lard
Approx. 1 ½ cups of milk (or add an egg or two to liquid to make the 1 ½ cups)

Combine dry ingredients, cut in fat, and add liquid until the dough is soft but not too sticky. Form into an oval loaf. With a sharp knife, make a slash down the middle length ways, and two more cross ways. Bake in a hot oven (375 degrees) for about 40 minutes, or until golden brown.

NOTE: This is my version of what I had seen my mother in law do years ago. First time I had bannock, it was cooked in a frypan on top of a grate on an outdoor rock fireplace. In front of the fire, on a hardwood plank, was a salmon "planking". (Recipe to follow). I can’t ever remember a tastier meal before, or since. She also served fresh peas, corn, and potatoe salad.

Mom uses whatever fat she has handy. She uses lard, bacon grease, butter, margarine, or shortening. Liquid can include eggs or not, water or milk. Sometimes she combines half and half cornmeal (the gritty kind) and flour, but in that case will add more fat because the cornmeal can be dryer. She sometimes does it on top of the stove in a heavy frypan.

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Feather Mandela

 

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